Weekly Game Review: “12 chairs”

Year: 2002
Genre: Quest, Adventure
Discs: 2 CD(*.iso)
Developer: Saturn+
Entertainer: Buka
Requirements: Windows 98/Me/2000/XP, Celeron 300, ram 32 mb, Cd-Rom 4-x, DirectX 8.0
Hints: The bottom line: “12 chairs” – another game, produced jointly by “Buck” and “Saturn +” continues a series of animated quests. The passage contains spoilers to some parts of the game, so if you arent familiar with the game or dont want to know what to expect, recommended. The success of 3D console titles such as Super Mario 64 increased interest in hardware accelerated 3D graphics on PCs, and soon resulted in attempts to produce affordable solutions with the ATI Rage, Matrox Mystique, and S3 ViRGE. An early text-adventure, Adventure, was developed for the PDP-11 minicomputer by Will Crowther in 1976, and expanded by Don Woods in 1977.[4] By the 1980s, personal computers had become powerful enough to run games like Adventure, but by this time, graphics were beginning to become an important factor in games. While many companies used the additional storage to release poor-quality shovelware collections of older software, or "enhanced" versions of existing ones,[28] new games such as Myst included many more assets for a richer game experience. The success of 3D console titles such as Super Mario 64 increased interest in hardware accelerated 3D graphics on PCs, and soon resulted in attempts to produce affordable solutions with the ATI Rage, Matrox Mystique, and S3 ViRGE. Experts were unsure whether it affected 16-bit computer games,[17] but Hawkins in 1990 nonetheless had to deny rumors that Electronic Arts would withdraw from computers and only produce console games.[18] By 1993 ASCII Entertainment reported at a Software Publishing Association conference that the market for console games ($5.9 billion in revenue) was 12 times that of the computer-game market ($430 million). These extras gradually became less common, but many games were still sold in the traditional over-sized boxes that used to hold the extra "feelies". PC games, also known as computer games or personal computer games, are video games played on a personal computer rather than a dedicated video game console or arcade machine. The first generation of computer games were often text adventures or interactive fiction, in which the player communicated with the computer by entering commands through a keyboard. As 3D graphics libraries such as DirectX and OpenGL matured and knocked proprietary interfaces out of the market, these platforms gained greater acceptance in the market, particularly with their demonstrated benefits in games such as Unreal.[33] However, major changes to the Microsoft Windows operating system, by then the market leader, made many older DOS-based games unplayable on Windows NT, and later, Windows XP (without using an emulator, such as DOSbox). By the end of 1989, however, most publishers moved to at supporting at least 320x200 MCGA, a subset of VGA.[21] VGA gave the PC graphics that outmatched the Commodore Amiga.

Walkthrough:

This is a detective game in which you have a helper named Smart Alex. Using Smart Alex you can explore and analyze the items that were in your inventory, interact with different objects, turn on/off the flashlight, move to another location, get hints, and, in addition, to skip the puzzle. The game has a scoring system that determines what rank you get at the end of the game. The more points you earn, the higher the rating. Points are awarded for various actions, for example, collecting comic books, solving puzzles, etc. NOTE: At the simplest level of complexity you lose points for skipping puzzles and the use of Smart tips Alex. Also, you lose points for dying, regardless of difficulty level. Vorobyaninov decides to look for the treasure alone, but by chance he meets on his way tipster Ostap Bender. PC games, also known as computer games or personal computer games, are video games played on a personal computer rather than a dedicated video game console or arcade machine. Electronic Arts reported that customers used computers for games more than one fifth of the time whether or not they purchased them for work at home. By 1993 PC games required much more memory than other software, often consuming all of conventional memory, while peripheral device drivers could go into upper memory with DOS memory managers. From the mid-90s onwards, PC games lost mass-market traction to console games before enjoying a resurgence in the mid-2000s through digital distribution.[1][2] The uncoordinated nature of the PC game market and its lack of physical media make precisely assessing its size difficult. PC games, also known as computer games or personal computer games, are video games played on a personal computer rather than a dedicated video game console or arcade machine. In December 1992 Computer Gaming World reported that DOS accounted for 82% of computer-game sales in 1991, compared to Macintosh's 8% and Amiga's 5%. By 1987 the PC market was growing so quickly that the formerly business-only computer had become the largest and most important platform for computer game companies. Further improvements to game artwork and audio were made possible with the introduction of FM synthesis sound. An early text-adventure, Adventure, was developed for the PDP-11 minicomputer by Will Crowther in 1976, and expanded by Don Woods in 1977.[4] By the 1980s, personal computers had become powerful enough to run games like Adventure, but by this time, graphics were beginning to become an important factor in games. From the mid-90s onwards, PC games lost mass-market traction to console games before enjoying a resurgence in the mid-2000s through digital distribution.[1][2] The uncoordinated nature of the PC game market and its lack of physical media make precisely assessing its size difficult.